Hello there, Weekend Warriors! If you’re relocating to London, please join me again as I über-informally chronicle the British monarchs. Last week we saw the sad, brief reign of Edward V, the boy-king who was allegedly murdered by his very uncle, the new King Richard III.

The unscrupulous Richard III will be the last king to reign from the York line and indeed of the Plantagenet dynasty after a long line of its Yorkist and Lancastrian factions have served (the very family that engaged in civil war over this power, known famously as the War of the Roses). As we saw in earlier posts, Richard was instrumental in bringing his brother, Edward IV, to the throne, but in disposing of young Edward V, Richard himself is crowned in 1483.

That same year, the Duke of Buckingham—who had once assisted Richard III—raises a rebellion against the king, but he is readily defeated. Nonetheless, the rising was enough to strip away some of the nobility’s support for the new king. Buckingham’s aim was to replace Richard III with a man by the name of Henry Tudor, who is a more distant relation to the Lancastrian line. Tudor’s troops rally in 1485 and defeat Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field, where the king is killed.

On Richard III’s death ascends a new monarch, King Henry VII. And thus begins the House of Tudor…

 

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