Howdy there, Weekend Warriors! Welcome back to another installment of British history to give you a little background before you move to London. Last week, we bid adieu to King Edward I, a.k.a. Longshacks, and shall now pave the way for his fourth son, Edward II.

This is the heir who we learned last time is the very first Prince of Wales, as a result of his father’s domination of that region. What’s so special about Edward II that he scores the throne of England as well instead of one of his three older brothers? Well, quite sadly, all three of them have already passed away, so Edward II is indeed the next logical successor in 1307.

It seems this younger brother, however, is not quite footing the bill as monarch. Whereas his father had restored respect for the monarchy and experienced success in government expansion and military campaigns throughout the British Isles, Edward II is a weaker leader who seems to revert the monarchy right back to the fine mess where Kings John and Henry III had left it. The barons are pissed again, and Robert Bruce (who has picked up where William Wallace left off—recall that Edward I died on his way to battle Bruce) is reigning victorious (securing an independence for Scotland in 1314 that is to last until 1707).

One issue the English nobles have a particular gripe about is Edward II’s influence under his favorite, Piers Gaveston—Edward I himself had banished Gaveston to France to separate from him from his son, but Edward II promptly brought him back once king. The money and power he grants his favorite alienates officials to the point that the 1310 and 1311 Parliaments both exile Gaveston yet again, only for barons to execute him in 1312.

Ay yay-yay, Edward. Not lookin’ good for you. We’ll wait to see what happens in our next episode of Weekend Warrior Sunday. In the meantime, happy wishes for the start of your week from London Relocation!

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