If you’re making the international relocation and scavenging through our blog archives here for some advice, I’m feeling in a Top-5 mood and have decided to make it a little easier to find what you might be looking for. Below please find some of my past series of posts related to moving to London:

  1. Relocation UK – The Needs of an Accompanying Spouse” – This link takes you to the first in a six-part series I wrote explaining why a relocation can be tough for anyone but particularly the spouse or partner who moves to London on behalf of their loved one’s job. This series specifically looks at the adjustment in terms of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Need, as an international relocation may not satisfy needs that have been previously met at home, at least not straight away.
  2. Relocation to London – Speak British English Like a Local” – America and the UK are divided by a common language: English. This post is a glossary of British-English terms related to Home & Garden and is the first in a series of seven providing lingo with respect to: Clothing, Children, Food, Sundries, Transportation, and a Random finale.
  3. Some Neighborhood Know-How on Where to Live” – This series of seven-and-counting posts (there’s a south London region I still need to touch on) is a brief overview of London’s directional postcodes and what generally characterizes each of them as you try to find a fit for your lifestyle and budget. For more comprehensive neighborhood-by-neighborhood information, of course, please do contact a knowledgeable Relocation agent.
  4. Americans Moving: Finding Your Comfort Zone” + “Americans Moving : Moving OUT of Your Comfort Zone” – Two posts apiece, this is essentially a four-post series giving those relocating from the US a heads-up on where to find what’s familiar and where to embrace the unfamiliar in getting adjusted after a move.
  5. Getting to Know Types of UK Schools for Your Relocation” – this two-part weekend series on the many varieties of schooling offered in the UK is also supplemented by two other closely related posts:  “Moving with Children – The Benefits of International Schooling” and “Moving with Children – International Schools vs. Other UK Options.”

This is obviously only a handful of the things to consider when making a relocatio, but you gotta start somewhere, right? I hope these series of posts assist in your move, and please know that any other topics and questions you may have specific to your relocation circumstances can be fielded immediately by a member of staffat our offices.