Your relocation to London will be easier if you have a good grasp of a victual vocabulary! Learning the different names for foodstuff can be a big help at the grocery store, where you’ll find that some things don’t even look the same. Having a firm grasp on the different phrases for food that many Londoners use will also help you at the office after you relocation to London. You won’t be wondering what a “chip butty” is for starters.

Relocation UK – Getting the hang of English food

Let’s start with chips. Many American moving to London spend quite a while figuring out that chips are actually French fries. English fries are much larger than the skinny chips of potato that you may be used to. They are also much fattier and usually come doused liberally in salt and vinegar from you local ‘chippy’. A chip butty is a sandwich made from white bread, lots of butter, hot oily chips and tomato sauce! It’s a treat to be sure, but not for the faint of heart or the strictly health conscious. It’s a guilty pleasure!

Tomato sauce is easy. It’s ketchup. You’ll never hear it called ketchup after your relocation to London and it’ll only ever be sold in the grocery store as Tomato Sauce.

Tea is not just a drink! Well it is of course, but the word tea can be used to describe the hot beverage, or the early evening meal that you may think of as dinner. Some people do call it supper or dinner, but a large majority of people living in London will refer to their evening meal as ‘tea’. This is not to be confused with ‘high-tea’ which is taken during the afternoon at posh establishments like The Ritz Hotel

Food Fables – Translating the Basics after your Relocation to London

Aubergine = Eggplant

Banger = Sausage

Beetroot = Beets

Biscuit = Cookie

Coriander/ Dhanya = Cilantro

Courgette = Zucchini

Jam = Jelly

Gherkin = Pickle

Pickle = does not have a relative term, but buy a bottle of Branston’s Pickle soon after your move, go and try it out.

There are many terms that you’ll need to know to help make baking and cooking easier for you after your relocation, these are just a few of the most commonly confused terms.