A relocation to London from America entails an education in learning British English. My past posts on “speaking the Queen’s English” (found under the “London Language Barriers” category) include grocery items, and the list below should be more exhaustive. Yesterday we talked about vocabulary relating to children, so whether you have young mouths to feed or just your own, now you’ll know what to look for in the grocery aisles:

[American English = British English]

Fruits & Vegetables
arugula = rocket
cilantro = coriander
eggplant = aubergine
endive = chicory
lima bean = broad bean
pit (as in fruit) = stone
raisin = sultana
rutabaga/turnip = swede
scallion = spring onion
squash = (similar to) marrow
zucchini = courgettes

Meat & Fish
ham, cured/smoked (from the hind leg) = gammon
hamburger meat = beef mince
roast = joint (meat)
slice of bacon = rasher
smoked herring = kipper

Breads
hamburger bun = bap
whole grain wheat bread = granary bread
hotdog bun = bridge roll

Snacks / Sweets
candy = sweets
cookie/cracker = biscuit
cotton candy = cotton floss
dessert = pudding
fries = chips
popsicle = iced lolly
potato chips = crisps
soda cracker = cream cracker

Baking
corn starch = corn flour
molasses = black treacle
powdered sugar = icing sugar

Breakfast/Brunch (miscellaneous)
cream of wheat = semolina
crèpe = pancake
pancake/flapjack = American/Scottish pancake (‘flapjacks’ are more like granola bars with oats & syrup)
oatmeal = porridge

Beverage
with or without cream (as for coffee) = black or white
straight = neat

Other Grocery-Related
can = tin
cart = trolley

Our London Relocation agents will find you an apartment rental with plenty of cabinet space for these groceries, though I can’t promise you’ll find a fridge much bigger than the average ones that come in a flat (see my earlier post, “What to Expect in a London Flat: Crouching Tenant, Hidden Dishwasher,” for more description of a typical  apartment kitchen). May this whet your appetite for your international relocation. 🙂