Autumn is one of the best times to consider your relocation to London. The tourist rush of summer is over, most schools and companies are back to business, and the weather is crisp and chilly rather than distinctly cold.

Most relocation agents do a brisk trade at this time of the year. The beginning of autumn sees a huge demand for rental apartments. If you are considering a relocation jobs package you should factor in the cost of finding a apartment and the other hundred and one things that could put you out of pocket. While your employer will handle most of the paperwork, including visas and work permits, you need to be aware of the true cost of moving to London.

Consider using one of the professional London relocation services companies to handle your move and find you a rental just days after you arrive. Not only will you be settled into London life faster, but you’ll have much less stress on both sides of the Atlantic.

Autumn is the perfect time to explore the city of London. If you really want to get out and see what London has to offer, then it’s best to do it on foot. Not only will you be doing a lot of walking around the city while you are living here, but it really is the best way to experience London up close and personal.

A great book that has just been published: “London’s Lost Rivers – A Walkers Guide” is the perfect example of how to discover a London that is far from the common tourist traps. The book details eight walks along the banks of small rivers in the city itself. There are four walks north of the River Thames and four leading to the south.

It’s an anecdotal and rather unique guide filled with interesting trivia, photos and illustrations, as well as hand drawn maps. The book is not available on Kindle yet, but you can get a copy through Amazon for about £14.

Part of your relocation to London planning should be a list of places to go after you arrive. Get out and about now; you’ve got a long winter ahead of you.

(Still wondering what autumn is? For Americans moving to London or planning their relocation, ‘Autumn’ is translated into ‘Fall’.)