After surviving your relocation you deserve to relax a bit and take in some of the history and beauty of the city.  There is no better way to do that this weekend than by taking the entire family to visit the Dickens exhibition at the Museum of London.  Most Americans cherish the images of the city and the neighboring countryside Dickens so eloquently wrote about.

Dickens, who lived and wrote in the nineteenth century, brought to light social problems on his era in beautifully written stories still cherished today.  His heart-breaking story of little Oliver Twist shed light on the appalling conditions of London’s poor, especially the children.  Other stories that have endured the test of time are A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield and Great Expectations.  Dickens was not afraid to write about volatile social issues and expose corruption with a sense of humor.

The exhibition at the Museum of London provides a glimpse into an older London when Dickens walked its streets.  Americans moving here for a corporate relocation can appreciate the technological wonders of the presentation.  An audio/visual production accompanies the tour through the exhibition and guests are amazed to find themselves transported back in time to the hard streets of nineteenth century London.  A new documentary by William Raban, one of the UK’s premier filmmakers, explores the differences and similarities between the sordid night life now and in when Dickens wrote.

While the exhibition is a wonderful learning experience for children after an international relocation, some of the themes may be too much for younger children.  A good idea for parents would be to discuss the issues of Dickens’ day before encountering them at the exhibit.  Included topics are child labor, prostitution, infant and child mortality, and the disparity between the wealthy and poor.

While at the Museum of London you can participate in the Victorian Christmas Grotto and experience a Victorian Christmas with all the festivities.  Santa Claus will be on and many activities for the entire family will be available.  Relocation can leave American families feeling lost in a city so large, but this weekend a trip back to the nineteenth century can ease the transition.