For most people moving to London from America snow is a normal part of the winter season.  With over half of the United States seeing at least one good snow fall each winter there is a good chance that an American expat is used to a good snowfall.  Unfortunately, this city is not so well-equipped.  Many people mistakenly assume that since it is milder in the summer than most of the US (and very similar to the US Northeast) its winters are nasty and full of snow and ice.  The truth, though, surprises most moving to London – London sees very little snow.

London is in the south of England.  In the northern parts of England and in other northern countries in the United Kingdom, like Scotland, snow is a fairly normal occurrence during the winter months.  Farther south, however, snow rarely falls to the shock of most moving here.  The winter days and nights are cool with the temperatures usually staying in the upper thirties and forties (in Fahrenheit).  This is not cold enough for snow.

Occasionally it does snow though but most snow storms produce less than two inches of snow.  Those moving here often watch in amazement at the reactions of locals at this small amount of snow; something of a frenzy breaks out incredibly enough.  With as little as three inches public transportation has been halted and workplaces closed.  Anyone moving from the northern part of the States doesn’t even consider that a legitimate snowfall!

Even though it may not snow very often the winter days are wet.  Rain falls over half the days during the winter season keeping roads and pavements (sidewalks) wet constantly.  Even with temperatures well above freezing these surfaces can become slippery.  Anyone moving to England should not underestimate the winter weather just because of the lack of snow.  Wet and dreary, everyone knows when winter is underway in England.  Although it may be rare those moving will probably see a Dickens’-worthy postcard picture of London covered in snow at some point.

 

Share This