Greetings, Sunday Weekend Warriors! Those of you relocating to London who are interested in learning more about the British monarchy have come to right place. Last week, I had just recapped the segment of the War of the Roses that had helped bring Edward IV into power not just once, but twice. As of when we left off, Edward IV had retaken the English crown in 1471, picking up where he left off after his initial 1461-1470 reign.

Well, I hope I didn’t get your hopes up last week about this second chapter in Edward’s story, because it’s relatively uneventful. Which is a good thing for England, really. Edward’s years from 1471 to 1483 are a time of peace in the kingdom, which has seen so much strife up until now. Edward doesn’t have to rely as much on parliamentary grants for money, as he uses funds from Crown Estates to pay off government expenditures. Treaties and overall organization and calm improve trading and customs revenues, and parliament only needs to be called into session a handful of times.

Not all is footloose and fancy-free, though. In return for his treasonous activity, Edward IV’s brother George (the Duke of Clarence) is executed in 1478. Furthermore, Edward IV’s marriage to a commoner, Elizabeth Woodville, had not only outraged his once-advisor-turned-enemy Warwick (who we met last week), but other nobles as well, including Edward IV’s brother, Richard (we’ve come a long ways these days given the positive appraisal of Kate Middleton!). Richard thus plays this card to drum up support for himself, who comes into power upon disposing Edward IV’s eldest son, Edward V (who ascends the throne in 1483 on his father’s death). Edward V is only twelve years old, however, so he and his young brother are left in Richard’s care, but as we’ll see next week, their fate is a sad one that any modern-day tourists at the Tower of London will readily learn…

Until then, good luck planning your London move and let London Relocation know if there’s any way we can help!