If you’re making an international relocation, I’m making your move more festive with the London Relocation company’s version of the Twelve Days of Christmas! The next line in the original is: “On the eighth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me eight maids a-milking.

Please join me in now singing our Christmas carol:

“On the eighth day of Christmas, London gave to me…

ICECREAMISTS MILKING…WOMEN!”

I wish I were kidding on this one. Located in London’s lovely and always-bustling Covent Garden is The Icecreamists ice cream parlor, housing some of the world’s most original and, well, controversial flavors. Take “Baby Gaga,” for one. Introduced in February of this year, this flavor was seized by March for safety tests because it was made of, um…human breast milk. And as if it wasn’t enough having the Westminster Council on its case trying to get the flavor banned, Lady Gaga engaged them in a legal battle over the name. Since when is baby babble like “gaga” trademarked? Anyway, they did change the name to “Baby Googoo,” but as the year draws to a close, I’m not sure whether they sell it anymore. This isn’t to say people don’t still ask for it every day, and, regardless, they have a huge variety of extreme and creative flavors like the Ecuadorian dark chocolate “Choc and Awe,” the “Apocalypse Chow” with ginger, lemon grass, and chilli, and the “Miss Whiplash” berry sorbet with raspberry vodka. And the ingredients are purer and richer than most ice cream, which founder Matt O’Connor says “hasn’t seen a cow in its life.” Icreamists goal is to “do for frozen desserts ‘what the Sex Pistols did for music.'” In this respect, it’s “more Sid and Nancy than Ben & Jerry,” so treat yourself to some ice cream with a punk punch—it’s a foreign adventure for your tastebuds once your own has begun on moving to London.
[quotations taken from Icecreamists blog at blog.theicecreamists.com]

Now, to continue our caroling:

“…Swan patrons swilling,
shot geese fileting,
five Olympic rings!
More calling plans,
pretty fresh hens,
sea turtle tanks,
and a cartridge to hunt in country.”