After your relocation to London you will likely be enjoying the diversity of all that London has to offer. As an American you sometimes may want to enjoy a little taste of home.  If you are happening to catch a famed London Theater performance there’s a restaurant you may want to try in that district (Covent Garden area) that will remind you of a fancy steakhouse meal back home.  Christopher’s combines the traditional theater atmosphere of the Victorian age popular pastime with its architecture while serving a “Neo-American” fare.

In the mid 1800’s the building itself was home to a paper-mache company.  Its original façade was improved back in 1870 when the building opened as the first legal casino in London.  The gaming house was infamous and offered everything from horse racing bets to gaming gentlemen’s tables.  It was said to offer gentlemen a great deal more in regards to the ladies company on higher floors.  Though the brothel is long gone, as is the gambling, the façade and ornate stone spiral staircase that adorn Christopher’s still remain.

It is from the top of the staircase that the main dining room boasts great floor to ceiling windows.  From the windows you can take in an excellent view of the Waterloo Bridge.  This American based restaurant bases it’s menu’s on American fare and American preparations of many steak house favorites.  It even boasts a Martini bar, a very American trend in the last decade.

An interesting side note, if after your  relocation UK you feel James Bond-ish and wish to learn to make the perfect martini (of course “shaken not stirred”), then Christopher’s is offering something of interest to you in the month of September.  “Martini Masterclasses” are being offered throughout the month in which you will learn not only the history of the martini, but sumptuous recipes for making the perfect blends and a skill that will no doubt be impressive on your visits back home to the States.  After your Relocation UK and while living in London it’s still possible to once in a while combine the elegance of the Victorian age with American fare.