Moving to London is going to be one of the most interesting and informative periods of your life. You will have the opportunity to immerse yourself in a new culture and experience living in one of the greatest cities in the world. Now is not the time to stay at home in your London apartment; you need to get out and experience everything that London has to offer. Part of living in London, and indeed the rest of England is going down to the pub for a couple of pints.

One of the biggest differences between the United States and England is the age at which it is legal to drink. In England, the legal age is 18, compared to the age of 21 in most other countries. England and London especially has a great pub culture and the local pub is the centre on the community in many parts of England. Pubs and bars in England have to close at 11pm, although some nightclubs are allowed to sell alcohol until the early hours of the morning.

Pub Culture

It might seem as of life revolves around the opening and closing hours of the pub in your new neighbourhood. Traditionally a pub/bar is a place for the locals to meet, catch up on the neighbourhood news and relax after a day at work, or even stop off for a pint of beer and a snack in the middle of the day. Drinking during the working day is quite common, with people spending their lunch hour in the pub and their fellow workers having a drink before heading back to work for the rest of the day. This is considered a way of doing business in England, and not anything out of the ordinary.

Beer?

The word beer covers the alcoholic beverages of ale and bitter. Lager is like beer, but not called beer. Confused?  Beer in England is very different from beer in the rest of the world. You will probably be able to find your favourite beer from home at any of the speciality stores and upmarket pubs and bars, so you will not have to go without your ‘Bud’ if you do not want to. You should try some of the local, beers and lagers that are available though. It will make for some interesting drinking. Beers are served at a slightly higher temperature than in the States. It is traditional to serve beer at the temperature that it was fermented at, which is cooler than room temperature, but is not ice cold.

‘Going down the local’ is one of the biggest traditions in England and whether you are in a rustic country pub or at a trendy, cocktail bar, everyone has a ‘local’. Get out, find a pub that suits your lifestyle and your neighbourhood, and have some fun.